Book Review: Soundless by Richelle Mead

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Soundless | Richelle Mead | On Sale Since Nov 10, 2015
Razorbill | 272 Pages | ARC Provided by Publisher

Synopsis:

For as long as Fei can remember, there has been no sound in her village, where rocky terrain and frequent avalanches prevent residents from self-sustaining. Fei and her people are at the mercy of a zipline that carries food up the treacherous cliffs from Beiguo, a mysterious faraway kingdom.


 

When villagers begin to lose their sight, deliveries from the zipline shrink and many go hungry. Fei’s home, the people she loves, and her entire existence is plunged into crisis, under threat of darkness and starvation.


 

But soon Fei is awoken in the night by a searing noise, and sound becomes her weapon.


 

Richelle Mead takes readers on a triumphant journey from the peak of Fei’s jagged mountain village to the valley of Beiugo, where a startling truth and an unlikely romance will change her life forever…

Review:

Continue reading Book Review: Soundless by Richelle Mead

#ReadWomen December

Greetings, everyone! So, I’ve decided to take part in #ReadWomen December. This is something I just found out about today, and am very excited about. The gist is that for a month, readers have decided to deck out their reading lists with female authors – some choosing to read female authors only for December, others vowing to include more women writers than they usually read. For more information, the twitter hashtag has been a great resource for me.

So in honor of celebrating women’s voices, I thought I’d share some of my favorite books by female authors, as well as a few books on my own #ReadWomen reading list.

Recommendations:

  • Anna and the French Kiss by Stephanie Perkins
  • Lois Lane: Fallout by Gwenda Bond
  • Eleanor and Park by Rainbow Rowell
  • The Bone Season by Samantha Shannon
  • The Snow Child by Eowyn Ivey
  • Everything, Everything by Nicola Yoon
  • Hyperbole and a Half by Allie Brosh
  • The Age of Miracles by Karen Thompson Walker
  • The Glass Castle: A Memoir by Jeanette Walls

My Reading List:

  • Fun Home by Alison Bedchel
  • The Snow Child by Eowyn Ivey (a reread)
  • The Diviners by Libba Bray
  • To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before by Jenny Han
  • The Blondes by Emily Schultz

Are you taking part in #ReadWomen December? What are you reading?

Book Review: Winter by Marissa Meyer + GIVEAWAY

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Winter | Marissa Meyer | Feiwel and Friends
832 Pages | Paperback (via Book Depository) | Purchased

Synopsis:

Princess Winter is admired by the Lunar people for her grace and kindness, and despite the scars that mar her face, her beauty is said to be even more breathtaking than that of her stepmother, Queen Levana.

Winter despises her stepmother, and knows Levana won’t approve of her feelings for her childhood friend—the handsome palace guard, Jacin. But Winter isn’t as weak as Levana believes her to be and she’s been undermining her stepmother’s wishes for years. Together with the cyborg mechanic, Cinder, and her allies, Winter might even have the power to launch a revolution and win a war that’s been raging for far too long.

Can Cinder, Scarlet, Cress, and Winter defeat Levana and find their happily ever afters?

Review:

I’ve previously blogged about my experiences reading the previous books in the Lunar Chronicles series, Cinder, Scarlet, and Cress. In short, I think they’re awesome, especially the Chronicles’ first book. Continue reading Book Review: Winter by Marissa Meyer + GIVEAWAY

Book Review: More Happy Than Not by Adam Silvera

Title: More Happy Than Not

Author: Adam Silvera

Publisher: Soho Press

Pub Date: June 2, 2015

Format: Hardcover

Pages: 293

Source: Purchased

Synopsis:
In the months after his father’s suicide, it’s been tough for 16-year-old Aaron Soto to find happiness again–but he’s still gunning for it. With the support of his girlfriend Genevieve and his overworked mom, he’s slowly remembering what that might feel like. But grief and the smile-shaped scar on his wrist prevent him from forgetting completely.


When Genevieve leaves for a couple of weeks, Aaron spends all his time hanging out with this new guy, Thomas. Aaron’s crew notices, and they’re not exactly thrilled. But Aaron can’t deny the happiness Thomas brings or how Thomas makes him feel safe from himself, despite the tensions their friendship is stirring with his girlfriend and friends. Since Aaron can’t stay away from Thomas or turn off his newfound feelings for him, he considers turning to the Leteo Institute’s revolutionary memory-alteration procedure to straighten himself out, even if it means forgetting who he truly is.


Why does happiness have to be so hard?

Review:

Attention everyone: If you are looking for one last book to round out your summer reading list, this might be the one! Continue reading Book Review: More Happy Than Not by Adam Silvera

Book Review: Never Always Sometimes by Adi Alsaid

Never Always Sometimes

Never Always SometimesTitle: Never Always Sometimes
Author: Adi Alsaid
Publisher: Harlequin Teen
Pub Date: August 4, 2015
Format: ARC Paperback
Pages: 320
Source: provided by publisher

Synopsis:
Never date your best friend


 

Always be original


 

Sometimes rules are meant to be broken


 

Best friends Dave and Julia were determined to never be cliché high school kids—the ones who sit at the same lunch table every day, dissecting the drama from homeroom and plotting their campaigns for prom king and queen. They even wrote their own Never List of everything they vowed they’d never, ever do in high school.


 

Some of the rules have been easy to follow, like #5, never die your hair a color of the rainbow, or #7, never hook up with a teacher. But Dave has a secret: he’s broken rule #8, never pine silently after someone for the entirety of high school. It’s either that or break rule #10, never date your best friend. Dave has loved Julia for as long as he can remember.


Continue reading Book Review: Never Always Sometimes by Adi Alsaid